Title: IRIS toxicological database 
Resource Type: web links 
Producers or distributor US EPA 
Author / Producer Type: Agency, regulator or other governmental or inter-governmental body 
EUGRIS Keyword(s): Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->BTEX
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->Chlorinated aliphatics
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->Heavy metals
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->MTBE
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->Nitroaromatics
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->Others
Contaminated land-->Contaminants-->PAH
Contaminated land-->policy and regulatory
Contaminated land-->Risk assessment-->Toxicological information
Diffuse pollution-->Contaminants-->Hydrocarbons
Diffuse pollution-->Contaminants-->Persistent Organic Pollutants
Diffuse pollution-->Contaminants-->Pesticides
Diffuse pollution-->Processes
 
Short description: IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. IRIS was initially developed for US EPA staff in response to a growing demand for consistent information on chemical substances for use in risk assessments, decision-making and regulatory activities. 
Long description: The Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), prepared and maintained by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), is an electronic database containing information on human health effects that may result from exposure to various chemicals in the environment. IRIS was initially developed for EPA staff in response to a growing demand for consistent information on chemical substances for use in risk assessments, decision-making and regulatory activities. The information in IRIS is intended for those without extensive training in toxicology, but with some knowledge of health sciences. The heart of the IRIS system is its collection of computer files covering individual chemicals. These chemical files contain descriptive and quantitative information in the following categories: -Oral reference doses and inhalation reference concentrations (RfDs and RfCs, respectively) for chronic noncarcinogenic health effects. -Hazard identification, oral slope factors, and oral and inhalation unit risks for carcinogenic effects. 
Submitted By: Katy Baker WhoDoesWhat?      Last update: 03/12/2004